Robot-assisted ipsilateral partial nephrectomy with distal ureterectomy for synchronous renal and ureteric tumors-a case report by Anandan Murugesan

CONCLUSION: Minimally invasive nephron sparing surgery is feasible and reasonable option with satisfactory oncological control even in ipsilateral synchronous renal and ureteric tumors in selected patients with renal dysfunction.

J Egypt Natl Canc Inst. 2022 Nov 28;34(1):49. doi: 10.1186/s43046-022-00151-2.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Ipsilateral synchronous renal and ureteric tumor is uncommon. Nephron sparing surgery is the standard for small renal masses. Ureteric tumors can be selectively managed with nephron sparing surgery, especially in renal dysfunction. This case report details the management of double malignancy by nephron sparing surgery with robot-assisted approach.

CASE REPORT: A 63-year-old gentleman with diabetes presented with history of intermittent gross hematuria for 2 weeks. He was clinically normal. On evaluation, he had grade 4 renal dysfunction (Se. creatinine 4.5 mg%) with mild proteinuria. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed right renal upper polar Bosniak III lesion and right hydroureteronephrosis due to 2 cm ureteric tumor near the vessel crossing. Renogram showed overall GFR of 22 ml/min with 31% (6 ml/min) contribution from the right side. He underwent robot-assisted right partial nephrectomy with distal ureterectomy and Boari flap ureteric reimplantation. Histopathology revealed margins free T2 clear cell carcinoma (kidney) and high-grade T3 transitional cell carcinoma (ureter). His nadir creatinine at 1 year follow-up was 3.3 mg% and no recurrence on MRI, cystoscopy, and ureteroscopy at 1 year.

CONCLUSION: Minimally invasive nephron sparing surgery is feasible and reasonable option with satisfactory oncological control even in ipsilateral synchronous renal and ureteric tumors in selected patients with renal dysfunction.

PMID:36437423 | DOI:10.1186/s43046-022-00151-2

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