Implementation of a community health worker-focused team-based model of care: What modifications do clinics make? by Laura J Sotelo Guerra

CONCLUSIONS: For clinics implementing team-based care interventions, the engagement of key clinical stakeholders early and often in the intervention adaptation and implementation process, and planning for intervention modifications at both at an organizational level and at a clinical level are critical for local implementation.

Front Health Serv. 2023 Jan 30;3:989157. doi: 10.3389/frhs.2023.989157. eCollection 2023.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Team-based care offers potential for integrating non-clinicians, such as community health workers (CHWs), into the primary care team to ensure that patients and families receive culturally relevant care to address their physical, social, and behavioral health and wellness needs. We describe how two federally qualified health center (FQHC) organizations adapted an evidence-based, team-based model of well-child care (WCC) designed to ensure that the parents of young children, aged 0-3, have their comprehensive preventive care needs met at WCC visits.

METHODS: Each FQHC formed a Project Working Group composed of clinicians, staff, and parents to determine what adaptations to make in the process of implementation of PARENT (Parent-Focused Redesign for Encounters, Newborns to Toddlers), a team-based care intervention that uses a CHW in the role of a preventive care coach. We use the Framework for Reporting Adaptations and Modifications to Evidence-based interventions (FRAME) to chronicle the various intervention modifications and the adaptation process, focusing on when and how modifications occurred, whether it was planned or unplanned, and the reasons and goals for the modification.

RESULTS: The Project Working Groups adapted several elements of the intervention in response to clinic priorities, workflow, staffing, space, and population need. Modifications were planned and proactive, and were made at the organization, clinic, and individual provider level. Modification decisions were made by the Project Working Group and operationalized by the Project Leadership Team. Examples of modifications include the following: (1) changing the parent coach educational requirement from a Master’s degree to a bachelor’s degree or equivalent experience to reflect the needs of the coach role; (2) the use of FQHC-specific templates for the coach’s documentation of the pre-visit screening in the electronic health record; and (3) the use of electronic social needs referral tools to help the coach track and follow up on social need referrals. The modifications did not change the core elements (i.e., parent coach provision of preventive care services) or intervention goals.

CONCLUSIONS: For clinics implementing team-based care interventions, the engagement of key clinical stakeholders early and often in the intervention adaptation and implementation process, and planning for intervention modifications at both at an organizational level and at a clinical level are critical for local implementation.

PMID:36926506 | PMC:PMC10012691 | DOI:10.3389/frhs.2023.989157

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