Evaluation of Reactive Oxygen Metabolites, Resistin, and Red Complex Bacteria in Obese Subjects with or without Periodontitis by Snophia Suresh

CONCLUSION: Our study results depict that obesity can be considered as a risk indicator for periodontal disease.

J Contemp Dent Pract. 2022 Jul 1;23(7):703-708.

ABSTRACT

AIM: The study’s aim was to assess and compare the clinical parameters, plasma reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM) levels, gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) resistin, serum resistin values, and red complex bacteria in obese or overweight subjects with and without periodontitis and also to determine the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy (NSPT) on plasma ROM, serum, and GCF resistin values in obese or overweight subjects with chronic periodontitis.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 160 subjects were recruited and designated into four groups with 40 subjects each as group I – obese with chronic periodontitis; group II – normal weight subjects with chronic periodontitis; group III – obese subjects with healthy periodontium; and group IV – normal weight subjects with healthy periodontium. The periodontal parameters, plasma ROM, GCF resistin and serum resistin, and red complex bacteria levels were estimated at baseline. After baseline assessment, scaling and root planing (SRP) were done in the patients of groups I and II. Two months after the completion of SRP, clinical parameters such as plaque index (PI), probing pocket depth (PPD), gingival index (GI), and clinical attachment loss (CAL), plasma ROM levels, serum resistin, and GCF resistin levels were analyzed.

RESULTS: An increase in plasma ROM, GCF resistin, and red complex bacteria levels was observed in obese subjects with periodontal disease and the increase was noted in obese subjects with healthy periodontium. Comparing plasma ROM, GCF resistin values between groups I and II, 2 months after SRP, a decrease in these levels were observed in group II.

CONCLUSION: Our study results depict that obesity can be considered as a risk indicator for periodontal disease.

CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Obesity has a negative impact on both general health and oral health. Promoting appropriate physical activity, healthy eating behavior, and oral hygiene practice are fundamental elements of the prevention of both obesity and periodontal disease.

PMID:36440516

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