Characteristics of Radiation-Related Intracranial Aneurysms: A Multicenter Retrospective Study by Z-Q Huang

CONCLUSIONS: Compared with the control group, radiation-related aneurysms are more prone to occur in men and young patients, with a higher percentage of sidewall aneurysms located in the ICA and posterior circulation arteries. Furthermore, SAH is highly prevalent in patients with radiation-induced aneurysms, indicating that dedicated screening for aneurysms after radiation therapy is necessary, but further studies are needed to determine when and how to screen.

AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. 2022 Aug;43(8):1131-1135. doi: 10.3174/ajnr.A7592.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Intracranial aneurysms, a rare complication of radiation therapy, have been reported mainly in case reports or case series. We performed a multicenter, retrospective cohort study to investigate the characteristics of radiation-induced intracranial aneurysms.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data on 2641 patients with intracranial aneurysms were retrospectively collected from 3 hospitals between January 2005 and June 2014. An additional 1519 patients were recruited from a single center between July 2014 and March 2020. Aneurysms in patients with a history of radiation therapy for at least 6 months were defined as radiation-related aneurysms. Patients’ demographic profiles, clinical characteristics, and aneurysm parameters detected on CTA were compared between radiation-related and control groups.

RESULTS: Of the 4160 patients, the average age was 57.9 (SD, 13.5) years, 2406 (57.8%) were women, 477 (11.5%) had multiple aneurysms, 3009 (72.3%) had SAH, and 34 (0.8%) had radiation-related aneurysms. The male-to-female ratio in the radiation-related group was significantly higher than that in the control group (2.4:1 versus 0.72:1, P = .001). The mean age of the radiation-related group was significantly younger than in the control group (51.4 [SD, 15.0] years versus 58.2 [SD, 13.5] years, P = .003). More patients in the radiation-related group presented with SAH than in the control group (without age and sex matching, 88.2% versus 72.2%, P = .037; with age and sex matching, 88.2% versus 58.8%, P = .006). Of the 4813 intracranial aneurysms, only 43 (0.9%) aneurysms were categorized as in the radiation-related group, whereas 4770 (99.1%) aneurysms constituted the control group. Compared with the control group, there was a significantly higher proportion of sidewall aneurysms (46.5% versus 32.3%, P = .048) and a predilection for aneurysms involving the ICA and posterior circulation arteries (72.1% versus 52.2%, P = .046) in the radiation-related group.

CONCLUSIONS: Compared with the control group, radiation-related aneurysms are more prone to occur in men and young patients, with a higher percentage of sidewall aneurysms located in the ICA and posterior circulation arteries. Furthermore, SAH is highly prevalent in patients with radiation-induced aneurysms, indicating that dedicated screening for aneurysms after radiation therapy is necessary, but further studies are needed to determine when and how to screen.

PMID:36920775 | DOI:10.3174/ajnr.A7592

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